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ways of Commerce to account for the phenomenon. will give the list, as I found it in the Blue Book of the Cape Colony, for labourers' clothing. Shirts 30s. 5d. per dozen. Shoes 10s. per pair. Jackets 15s. each. Waistcoats 7s. each. Trowsers 11s. 6d. per pair. Hats 5s. 6d. each. In these articles so much depends on quality that it is hard to make a comparison. In South Africa I was forced to buy two hats, and I got them very much cheaper than my London hatmaker would have sold me the same articles. House-rent, taking the Colony through, is a little dearer than in England. Domestic service is dearer; but the class of whom I am speaking would probably not be affected by this. The rate of wages for house servants as given in the Blue Book is as follows:Male domestic servants-European-£2 10s. a month, with board and lodging. Coloured-1 8s. European-1 75. Coloured 16s.

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I profess the greatest possible respect for the Cape Colony Blue Book and for its compilers. I feel when trusting to it that I am standing upon a rock against which waves of statistical criticism may dash themselves in vain. Such at least is my faith as to 968 out of the 969 folio pages which the last published volume contains. But I would put it to the compilers of that valuable volume, I would put it to my particular friend Captain Mills himself, whether they, whether he, can get a European man-servant for £30 a year, or a European damsel for £16 4s.! Double the money would not do it. Let them, let him, look at the book;-Section v. page 3;and have the little error corrected, lest English families should rush out to the Cape Colony thinking that they would be nicely waited upon by white fingers at these easy but fabulous rates. The truth is that European domestic servants can hardly be had for any money.

NATAL.

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CHAPTER XIV.

Natal.-History of the Colony.

THE little Colony of Natal has a special history of its own quite distinct from that of the Cape Colony which cannot be said to be its parent. In Australia, Queensland and Victoria were, in compliance with their own demands, separated from New South Wales. In South Africa the Transvaal Republic,-now again under British rule, and the Orange Free State were sent into the world to shift for themselves by the Mother Country. In these cases there is something akin to the not unnatural severance of the adult son from the home and the hands of his father. But Natal did not spring into existence after this fashion and has owed nothing to the fostering care of the Cape Colony. I will quote here the commencing words of a pamphlet on the political condition of Natal published in 1869, because they convey incidentally a true statement of the causes which led to its colonization. "The motives which induced the Imperial Government to claim Natal from the Dutch African emigrants were not merely philanthropic. The Dutch in their occupation of the country had been involved in serious struggles with the Zulus. The apprehension that these struggles might be renewed and that the wave of disturbance might be carried towards the Eastern frontier of the Cape influenced to some extent the resolution to colonize Natal. But whatever may have been the prudential considerations that entered into their counsels, the Government were deeply impressed with the wish to

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protect the Natives and to raise them in the scale of
humanity." From this the reader will learn that the
British took up the country from the Dutch who had on
occupying it been involved in difficulties with the Natives,
and that the English had stepped in to give a govern-
ment to the country, partly in defence of the Dutch
against the Natives,-but partly also, and chiefly in de-
fence of the Natives against the Dutch.
This was, in
truth, the case. The difficulties which the Dutch wan-
derers had encountered were awful, tragic, heartrending.
They had almost been annihilated. Dingaan, the then
chief of the Zulus, had resolved to annihilate them, and
had gone nearer to success than the Indians of Mexico
or Peru had ever done with Cortez or Pizarro. But they
had stood their ground,—and were not inclined to be
gentle in their dealings with the Zulus,-as the con-
gregation of tribes was called with which they had come
in contact.

Natal received its name four centuries ago. In 1497 it was visited, or at any rate seen,-by Vasco da Gama on Christmas day and was then called Terra Natalis from that cause. It is now called Na-tal, with the emphasis sharp on the last syllable. I remember when we simply translated the Latin word into plain English and called the place Port Natal in the ordinary way,- -as may be remembered by the following stanza from Tom Hood's "Miss Kelmansegg":

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"The form of Constitutional Government existing in the Colony of Natal considered," by John Bird. Mr. Bird's object is to shew that Natal is not in a condition to be benefitted by a parliamentary form of government, and his argu

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